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20121201
20121231
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CSPAN2 16
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English 16
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 1:30am EST
. karl rove would be impressed. most said the political elites only one-third owned slaves and most did not own any bets the deep south was confident they could do this and that they could pull it off. they had no trouble lining each other but it was a white man democracy. they had to sell its. they were not all confident. with paramilitary violence and intimidation. they called the convention by lunchtime on the first day unanimous. but what preceded that if you're in a meeting everything is unanimous don't you get suspicious? i do. other places it showed. in alabama the representatives charge they were run added of the union the they were being violated. that no ordinary farmer. the elites has run us out. it is very revealing of what democracy has been. they often and made the case what they really wanted was a republic. they did not like the way of politics but they had to play the game but they strongarm it ran through and to then the normal democratic process none of those seceded intel for sumpter was fired upon. even then there were four states that seceded it was incredibly cont
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 1:30pm EST
campaign in history. karl rove would have been impressed. they needed -- i mean, most of the political elite, only a third of the white adult male house owned slaves and most of them didn't own very many said the political elite that was orchestrating this especially they were extremely confident that they could do this and they believed that they would be able to pull that off and they didn't have any trouble lining each other but the challenge for them is that this was theoretically a white man's democracy. every white man got to vote. there were no property qualifications left. so they had to do this by electrical means. they had to win an election and they were not at all confident about that coming into was an incredible amount of violence and intimidation that went into it and the results are very uneven. they call a convention and voted up secession by lunchtime on the first day completely unanimously that's how they went out of the union. but what had preceded that? when you are in a meeting and everything is unanimous don't you get a little suspicious? why do. and there was a
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 8:00am EST
. [laughter] so i know, i know karl rove wants to think he invented all of this, but -- [laughter] we've been, we've been fighting these battles for a long time. so jefferson himself saw that we were always going to be divided. he said that men have divided themselves over the opinions of whether the interests of the many or the interests of the nobles should govern the affairs of men since these questions convulsed greece and rome. he was looking back at greece and rome in the way we look back at the founding to try to figure out how much of this division, how much of the divided opinion is natural, how much is unnatural, and how do you manage and try to do what you can with what we have. and his answer, wonderfully, was in theory he would want to go back to monticello. you know those wonderful quotations, we all know them. oh, if i could only be with my books and at my farm and at my family in the peace and respite of possibility cello. well, you know, the road was open. he could have gone. new york, philadelphia, williamsburg, richmond, paris, london, hold and, i mean, he was everywhere th
CSPAN
Dec 10, 2012 8:30am EST
strategists within the beltway. some people that you know about, that you've heard about. mr. rove, and i keep saying this because everybody says we should go back to karl rove's concept of the big tent. no. for karl rove the big tent is big, but it's empty. [laughter] because it's just to talk about the economy. talk about the economy, talk about the economy. don't talk about immigration. we went into nevada, people said don't talk about social issues, don't talk about immigration. and i said i'm going to talk about social issues, and i'm going to talk about immigration. we need -- the problem was that they thought that, the strategists told the republican candidates to win the primary you have to move to the extreme right on immigration. you have to sound like a restrictionist. and that is wrong. every study shows the american people, republicans and democrats, support immigration reform. he could have had a much more constructive message from the beginning of the primary. and if -- and i think he would have been much more competitive in the general election. now, i'm not saying that if you
CSPAN
Dec 16, 2012 10:00pm EST
of a bitch. [laughter] so, i know karl rove wants to think that he invented all of this but we have been fighting these battles for a long time. so, jefferson himself saw that we were all going to be divided. she said men have divided themselves over the opinions of whether the interest of the many were of the nobles should govern the affairs of men. she was looking back to greece and rome and the founding to figure out to figure out how much of the divided opinion as natural, how much is on natural and how do you manage and try to do what you can with what we have in his answer was in theory he would want to go back to monticello. you know those wonderful quotations. we all know them. if i could only be with my books and my farm and my family and at peace and rest of monticello. well, you know the road was open, she could have gone in new york, philadelphia, richmond, paris, london, holland. he was everywhere the action was. he was irresistibly drawn to it because it has a young man he entered into what he called the board election between submission and the sword. the american revoluti
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 9:00am EST
and iraq, the bush white house, the administration was very aggressive, particularly karl rove is not a shy person. carl did not hesitate to let us know if they upset with something we're doing. but it would, i didn't blame him for this. he was doing his job. he was an advocate. he was a very effective advocate and he took issue with a number things we did and we respond as best we could. >> you mention a couple of abc correspondents and an anchor. let me start with sam donaldson. what is sam like? >> san is exactly what you see on the air. just exactly. he's wonderfully irrepressible. he can't help being sam donaldson. [laughter] he does it at home. he does in time you run into them. he's so energetic. he's so passionate. he loves th the news. hilos washington particularly. loves politics. knows it backwards and forwards. is wonderful but sometimes he gets in his own way. by the way, one of the things i did is i push sand also back in the white house. even the white house correspondent for reagan, and when i went and i was not comfortable the way we were covering the clinton white house an
CSPAN
Dec 15, 2012 10:00am EST
. another obligation was to meet and turn the public which made him into a roving commercial advertisement, particularly for canadian pacific railway. a book near reading journey appeared the following year. hard to tell how much of it is his own prose. his comment on meeting the press in london, reporters were awfully with the end we have a lot of fun together, hands that the newsroom pros back in copenhagen and give him a final shape. but for the 44 days he went round the world, he was the star of the show. the premise of the journey was that a circumnavigation was the ultimate adventure, a good, but not dangerous test of character. that emphasis was reinforced by the reid introduction to the english translation which was written by graham stating around the world, everyone of us has made the voyage many times in our imaginations. the introduction made at this point typical not to magellan, the great pioneer of the whole thing. it threw in francis drake for good measure, but in its fast board to jules verne his posthumous of reputation was beginning his to send. his stories were challeng
CSPAN
Dec 10, 2012 8:30pm EST
about. mr. rove, and i say this because they say, oh, go back to carl rrk ove's con cement of the big tent. no, that is big, but it's empty. it's just to talk about the economy. talk about the economy. talk about the economy. don't talk immigration. we went to nevada. people said don't talk about social issues or immigration. i said i'm talking about social issues and immigration. we need -- the problem was they thought that the strategists told the republican candidates to win the primary, you have to move to the extreme right on immigration. you have to sound like a restrictionist. that is wrong. every study shows, american people, republicans and democrats, support immigration reform. he could have had a more constructive message from the beginning of the primary, and if -- he would have been more competitive in the general election. now, i'm not saying that if you have a good position on immigration you win enough support from latino voters, but at least they will not tune you out. we were tuned out completely. they were not listening to us, and, again, i go back to the media, par
CSPAN
Dec 28, 2012 11:00pm EST
're talking about is a set of washington's reckless spending habits. another guy stood up and said karl rove spoke this morning and you just read an article saying this is obama's problem. he seemed like a nice guy, but at karl rove spew better than yours. they were unwilling to listen to this show when amberson asked one of the tea party freshman. she said i.t. party constituents who insist we shouldn't raise the debt ceiling. can you explain what this is about? i don't want to lose my temper to them. i'd rather use it to you. this guy said the thing is it then reckless spending and if these are consequences, so be it. emerson went home and said wormy bequests of wine. i cannot believe i had a meeting with the type who claims to be a congressman. [laughter] >> although that would be a perfect base to land, we have one last question before we wrap it up. >> given that you go to a lot of these house of rep meetings, town halls, community meetings, are you hearing more or have you always hear people's day, if you just two days, meaning there's a correlation between doing some thing and in an r
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 7:00pm EST
a report at each of his stops. another obligation was to -- the public which made him into a roving commercial advertisement particulaparticula rly for canadian pacific railway. a book appeared in the following year. it's hard to tell how much of it is his own prose. his comment on meeting the press in london says ,-com,-com ma reporters were awfully witty and had a lot of fun together. hence the newsroom pros back in copenhagen had given the stories final shape. but for the 44 days he went around the world, holt was the star of the show. the premise of the journey was that of circumnavigation was the ultimate boy's adventure of good but not dangerous attempt. the emphasis is reinforced by the introduction of english transition which was written by a grown-up, stating around the world everyone of us has made the voyage many times in our imagination. the introduction made at this point typical magellan is a great pioneer of the whole thing, but then fast-forwarded. whose posthumous reputation was beginning its descent to that of children's author. the stories were challenging yet fac
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2012 7:15am EST
and charm the public, which made it into a roving commercial advertisement, particularly for canadian pacific railway. a book appeared in the following year. it's hard to tell how much of it is his own prose. is comment on meeting the press in london said reporters were awfully witty, and we have a lot of fun together. the newsroom pros back in copenhagen had given historic the final shape. but for the 44 days he went around the world, he was the star of the show. the premise of the journey was circumnavigation was the ultimate boys adventure, good but not dangers test of his character. that emphasis is reinforce by the english translation of his book which was written by a grown-up. skating around the world, everyone of us has made the voyage many times in our imagination. the introduction at this point typical nod to ferdinand magellan, the great pioneer of the whole thing. it through in francis drake for good money but then it fast forwarded to jules burns whose posthumous record his was beginning its descent to that of children's author. his stories for challenging him much as cir
CSPAN
Dec 14, 2012 8:00pm EST
of the discussion is that rove is calling in general. i said why do they call you general? reinfected near me? said later in the muslim brotherhood? he said yes. how did you keep that a secret? they give us training on how to hide her affiliation while the military. as steve's dissertation advisor likes to say, the pearl of any code is data. so that is one anecdote. but if you find multiple of these, we be able to keep that a pattern, but we don't have that at the moment. >> just one closing thought. i think very very impressive bunch and bought eric and i were meeting with some of the leaders a couple months ago, there's no panel of young people. during a coffee break, one of them explains that he met his wife at harvard. so well educated, here in america at the finest universities and his wife, they met at harvard. that is something we can look forward to the harvard educated southeast party leadership coming in egypt. with that, please join me in thanking first ambassador shalom cohen, my colleagues eric trager and congratulating once again, steve cook. thank you off for joining us today. [appla
CSPAN
Dec 27, 2012 11:00pm EST
. apparently obama doesn't want to do that. see you right, if karl rove was george w. bush's brain, then david axelrod is barack obama's home or. >> his what? >> his home or. >> that's a pretty good line that i wrote there. he is a pretty good homer. >> what do you mean by that? >> what i mean by that is david axelrod is a really and creator of personal stories for politicians. so when barack obama ran in 2008, he didn't have a record to run on because he hadn't done anything. what he did have to run on was his personal story. the son of an african, a black african and a white middle american mother, a man who saw his identity and founded, who was raised by his saintly grandparents and so forth and so on. this was a story, an american story if you will, he could as homer was known for talking about taking a trip and during the trip, coming to some inner understanding of oneself. this was the story that david axelrod fashion for obama to run on. it's a brilliant story. the problem is in 2012 there is no such story. we have seen that story. we know that story. that's old. he can't run on that st
CSPAN
Dec 28, 2012 6:00am EST
politically. and apparently, obama doesn't want to do that. >> host: you write, if karl rove was george w. bush's brain, then david axlerod is the barack obama's homer. >> guest: his what? >> host: homer. >> guest: that's a pretty good line i wrote there. [laughter] well, he is his homer. >> host: what do you mean by that? >> guest: what i mean is david axlerod is a brilliant creator of personal stories for politicians. so when barack obama ran in twaipt, -- in twaipt, he didn't have a record to run on, because he hadn't done anything. what he did have to run on was his personal story. the son of an african, black african and a white middle-american mother. a man who sought his identity and found it, who have raised by his, these saintly grandparents and so forth and so on. this was a story, a homerric story, if you will, because homer was with known for talking about taking a trip and coming to some understanding of one's self. this was the story that david axlerod fashioned for obama to run on, a brilliant story. the problem is, in 2012 there is no such story. we've seen that story, we
CSPAN
Dec 28, 2012 8:00pm EST
. another guy stood up and said karl rove spoke to us this morning and he has written an article in "the wall street journal" saying this is obama's problem. you seem like a nice guy but i like it better than yours. they were unwilling to listen. as a tea party freshman she said i have tea party constituents. can you explain to me what this is about? this guy said well, the thing is we have been reckless and are spending and if there are consequences then so be it. emerson went home to her husband and said pour me a very big glass of fine. i can't believe i just had a meeting with a guy who's going to be congressmen. [laughter] >> although that would be a perfect choice to end, we have one last question before we wrap it up. >> given 90 but a lot of these meetings, town halls and community meetings, are you hearing more or have you always heard people say, if you just do this, just to this meaning that there is a correlation between doing something and in end result whereas the nutty other factors are being considered? what we believe can result from taking action in the past? >> the tow
CSPAN
Dec 27, 2012 12:00pm EST
with the expiration of other certain fisa provisions including the roving wiretap, the business court orders and the lone wolf. it may seem like that ought to make sense that have you all of these expiring at that time but frankly having been involved in the intelligence community for the last 12 years now, it actually works in reverse from that, it would have a negative influence on the community itself. because if you match the f.a.a. sunset with the patriot and the erpta sunsets, it provides no real benefit to congressional oversight and could actually increase the risk that all of these authorities will expire at the same time and if they all expired at the same time, the community would certainly be in a real disadvantage position from an operational standpoint. the leahy amendment also makes a number of modifications to the executive branch oversight provisions that i believe simply are not necessary. for example, the amendment will require the inspector general of the intelligence community, icig, to conduct a mandatory review of u.s. person privacy rights in the context of the fisa a
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16